Part of NJBC’s Bariatric FAQ Series

 

When can I…..?  Is the start of many questions patients ask about recovery after bariatric surgery.  Whether you are scheduled for gastric sleeve, gastric bypass or LAP-BAND®, these questions come up all the time and our Bariatric FAQ series is here to give you answers.   

When can I … go back to work?

The biggest question on everyone’s mind after bariatric surgery, whether it’s gastric sleeve, gastric bypass, LAP-BAND® or the gastric balloon, is “When can I go back to work?” There is no one, definitive answer that applies to every patient since everyone’s body heals differently after surgery and jobs require a variety of levels of physical exertion.  According to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, the typical time away from work is approximately one to two weeks, however it can be longer for those who do strenuous, physical labor as part of their job. Post-surgery patients are advised to not lift anything 10 to 15 pounds or heavier for at least four weeks after surgery. If your occupation involves computer or desk work, some of our patients go back to work or work from home as early as three to five days after surgery; but don’t expect to work a full schedule. Our doctors and physician assistants will work with you to determine your return date, and will provide/prepare any paperwork needed for you to request the recovery time you need from your employer.

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    By: New Jersey Bariatric Center Staff

    New Jersey Bariatric Center®, a medical & surgical weight loss center with offices in Springfield, Somerset, Hoboken, East Brunswick, Hackettstown and Sparta, New Jersey, helps patients achieve long-term weight loss success through the most advanced bariatric surgery procedures, including gastric sleeve, gastric bypass, gastric band and gastric balloon procedures. Led by the team of Drs. Ajay Goyal, Angela Jack Glasnapp, James Buwen and Tina Thomas, New Jersey Bariatric Center®’s approach to patient care has resulted in zero mortalities and a complication rate that is lower than the national average.

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